The SGA Senate met as usual in the weeks leading up to the extension of spring break and the transition of the University into online classes. 

In preparation for the elections that would determine next year’s SGA roster, the current members of the executive cabinet took a little time to explain their roles. 

The roles of executive cabinet are President, Vice President, Treasurer, Senior Class President, Student Trustee, President Pro Tempore, UPC Coordinator, Administrative Vice President, Executive Secretary, Senate Clerk, Director of Social Services, Director of External Affairs, Freshman Forum Advisor, Director of Public Relations and Director of Diversity and Campus Outreach.

Out of these positions, only the positions of President, Vice President, Treasurer and Senior Class President are elected by the student body, all other positions in executive cabinet are by appointment either by the President or by the Senate. 

“Basically, the main job [of the president] is to serve as the bridge between us and the administration,” said Olivia Eldridge, SGA president regarding her current role as SGA president.  

For old business, the Senate brought Bill: 1920-B-037 to the floor. The bill would allocate funds to the Non-Profit studies 420 class for their community event. This would specifically go to supplies for the color run and water bottles for the warrior challenge. 

The bill passed unopposed. 

Another bill, Bill: 1920-B-038, was also brought to the floor for the Senate to consider. The bill would extend the SAC hours in the spring semester. The goal of the bill, as declared by its sponsors, is to be able to generate data on student interest in the extended hours for the SAC.

If the data shows a high attendance during the extended hours, they will present it to the SAC and possibly extend the hours permanently. 

A similar bill was passed in the spring last year, but due to poor record keeping, the Senate could not accurately present data showing it as successful, and therefore the SAC hours remained the same. 

When asked how the SAC bill would be affected by recent closure, Hollon said, “we unfortunately can’t move forward with the SAC bill. There really isn’t enough time left in the semester for it to be feasible.”

This does not mean that the SGA is not continuing to function outside of the University. 

According to Hollon, members of SGA are still discussing bills, and it is their intent to move their Senate voting process online for legislation.

Among the bills being discussed, Hollon said that she was in contact with Jenny Bell, the Director of Student Life, involving “how to appropriate the tech bill that would purchase technology to have constituent reports be digital.”

This bill is being worked on by the Academic affairs committee. SGA currently hopes to vote on the bill online after the end of spring break on March 30. 

Hollon also said that the Students’ Rights and Interest committee was working on legislation to have a vending machine installed in Strong hall, though she also said that UM was limiting purchases to necessities during this time. Because of this, Hollon said she emailed UM’s purchasing manager, Billie Jean Posey, to see if such a purchase would be feasible at this time.

“We’re going to do everything we can to move digitally and continue to represent students during this uncertain time,” said Hollon.